Guys generally don’t do a very good job when it comes to communicating about health issues. We tend to ignore them, as evidenced by our infrequent doctor’s visits. Yet, since 1999, the Movember movement has shone a 30 day spotlight on such issues as prostate cancer, testicular cancer, mental health and suicide prevention. In this article, we explore all things Movember in a blatant attempt to inspire you to unleash your own inner (and outer) moustache this November.

The Unlikely Origins of Movember

It all started with a bunch of Aussies in a pub in Adelaide. After one too many beers, one of them came up with the name Movember to represent a month of moustache growing in support of the RSPCA. Their catchphrase was ‘grow whiskers for whiskers.’ Five years later, another group of Aussies, this time in Melbourne, latched onto the concept and transferred to support for prostate cancer. 

Over the next few years, the Movember swept around the world. As of 2020, the movement has raised $911 million and funded more than 1,250 projects targeted toward combating prostate and testicular cancer as well as mental health and suicide prevention. 

The Australian group who started Movember were granted charity status in 2007. Three years later they started the Moscars, an awards event in which men around the world could submit a 4 minute video showcasing their efforts to support Movember. An international Man of Movember is also chosen annually from 21 national winners around the world. 

What You Can Do

When it comes to such huge issues as cancer, we as individuals can seem pretty helpless. Yet, Movember puts the power in our hands. With the simple act of growing a moustache, we can show our support for men’s health. By asking your friends, family and work mates to grow a mo with you, you can have an even greater impact. Every moustache grown will spark conversations, and those conversations will lend themselves to a growing awareness of men’s health issues.  The more this occurs, the more likely it is that men will be motivated to get regular tests for prostate and testicular cancer and to discuss mental health issues.

Growing a moustache is not the only thing you can do to support men’s health issues over the course of November this year. Globally, sixty men are lost to suicide very single hour. You can help bring the issue of suicide to light by running or walking for 60 miles over the course of the month. 

You can take the lead during Movember by hosting a Mo-Moment. There are no parameters here. Just get a crew together and do something fun and exciting under the Movember umbrella. It could be a physical challenge or a mental dexterity test. In keeping with the theme of men’s health issues, it would probably be a good idea to keep your Mo-Moment healthy!

By undertaking a fundraising event during Movember, you will be able to raise money to support men’s health research. You can choose to undertake an individual challenge, like doing a set number of push ups, or get together a group for a challenge like a marathon run. 

To support our fellow Aussie mates this Movember, Workout Meals will be donating $1 from every order during the month of November to Beyond Blue.

Where Does The Money Go?

All funds raised during Movember are used to fund research into men’s cancer and health issues as well as supporting men who currently have prostate and testicular cancer. This is providing men who have these types of cancers a better quality of life. Globally, one man dies from suicide every minute. Movember generated funds go towards helping men and boys to take action. One of the vital projects they provide for is the provision of mentors for young men who are struggling with depression and thoughts of ending their lives. 

The Movember Foundation is funding fresh new ideas to ensure that men and boys are mentally healthy and able to take positive action during tough times, with the support of their friends, family and community. 

About Prostate Cancer

Prostate cancer is among the most common cancers in men. It takes place in the small walnut shaped prostate gland. During its onset, there may be no symptoms that you have prostate cancer. Later signs include problems with urination, weak urination, blood in the semen and erectile dysfunction.

If you experience any of these signs you should immediately see your doctor.

In order to lower your probability of getting prostate cancer, you should follow a lifestyle that includes regular exercise, consisting of both weight resistance training and cardiovascular exercise, maintaining a healthy diet that includes plenty of fruits and vegetables and keeping your weight in check. 

About Testicular Cancer

Testicular cancer is the most common cancer in men between the ages of 15 and 60. It takes place in the testicles. It is unknown why men get testicular cancer or what they can do to lessen their chances of getting it.

Most men are able to self diagnose by way of a testicular self examination. You can do the test when lying in bed in the morning before you get up. Use your thumb and fingers to feel the surface of each testicle for lumps . Check, too, that the consistency is rubbery and regular. If you notice any things out of the ordinary, you should make an immediate appointment with your doctor. 

Wrap Up

With Movember fast approaching, it’s time to get your head around the whole Movember Movement. Firstly, make up your mind to grow a mo in support of men’s health issues. Then educate yourself around the issues by reading articles such as this one. That way, you will be prepared to discuss the issues that your new facial hair will prompt discussion about. Think, too, about other things you can do during Movember to support the cause and, possibly, help raise funds. If we all pitch in, we’ll be able to make this Movember the most successful yet!